Lifestyle

A nutritional powerhouse

A nutritional powerhouse

Perfect food for children

“Eggs play an important role in healthy growth and development in infants, children and adolescents,” says Sushma Ghag, Dietitian, Aster Hospital, Mankhool. “It’s a source of high-quality protein. Eggs have choline, which plays an integral role in several critical body functions. Eggs have docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), needed for children’s eyesight and brain development.”

It’s a source of high-quality protein. Eggs have choline, which plays an integral role in several critical body functions. Eggs have docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), needed for children’s eyesight and brain development.

- Sushma Ghag, Dietitian, Aster Hospital, Mankhool

Keep your eyes healthy

Eggs are good for adults as well. “Eggs have carotenoids, carotene and xanthophylls, which are natural pigments found in the yolk. These are associated with healthy eyesight, reducing the risk of developing cataracts,” says Ghag. 

Packed with vitamins

“Eggs contain many essential proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and bioactive compounds, and their compositions. You can get vitamins A, D, E, K and B6, thiamin, riboflavin and niacin from an egg,” says Ghag.

Boost brain power

“Choline, a vitamin-like essential nutrient, is very important for pregnant women as it helps in foetal brain development," says Prachi Telang, Dietitian, Prime Medical Centre. "Moreover, choline also regulates your memory function and mood.”

I always encourage my patients to pay attention to the style of cooking. For example, an omelette with lots of vegetables is a better choice than fried eggs.

- Prachi Telang, Dietitian, Prime Medical Centre

Maintain cholesterol levels

“Egg yolk contains cholesterol between 180-200mg depending on the size. Cholesterol consumption per day should be not more than 300mg for a normal individual. So, let’s say, one egg fulfils about 66.6 per cent of your daily requirement of cholesterol, which is important for the production of reproductive hormones and also vitamin D.

“Moreover, cholesterol is also required to produce bile salts, essential for the digestion of fats. According to American Heart Association, you can eat seven eggs a week as a part of a healthy diet and active lifestyle. This is also the safe limit for those who have type 2 diabetes,” says Telang.

Eggs don’t increase the risks of heart disease

“Eggs neither increase nor decrease the risk of heart disease in most people. Risk of heart disease is dependent on many factors such as your family history of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), total cholesterol score, your blood pressure, weight, physical activity level and your diet," says Telang.

“When we talk about CVDs, we put cholesterol under the spotlight. Being naturally rich in cholesterol, egg yolk’s consumption is often questioned. It is critical to understand that only 20 per cent of cholesterol in your blood comes from what you eat and the rest is produced by the body. Cholesterol levels are more influenced by the saturated and trans fats you consume from dietary sources.

“I always encourage my patients to pay attention to the style of cooking. For example, an omelette with lots of vegetables is a better choice than fried eggs. Also, check with your dietitian on how many eggs you can eat, if you have any of the risk factors for heart disease.”